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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 190 (some duplicates have been removed)
: jeffrey brown will be watching the congressional races for us all night. jeff, here's your first pass. >> brown: thank you, and with me is christina bellantoni and stuart rothenberg, editor of the rothen berg report to help sort through the senate races. let's start with florida, christina. >> none of the races that gwen and judy just mentioned called by the associated press were a big surprise but florida was an opportunity for the republicans. they thought this could end up being close. for a long time, senator nelson has been able to maintain his advantage there, even as the president and mitt romney are basically tied, in part pause he's as you been able to win the conservative democrats in the panhandle area of florida. but also this is just a state that has been so focused on for the presidential race, it hasn't gotten as much attention. >> brown: does it tell us much about the presidential race? >> i don't think so. if you talk to republicanned inners about connie mack's campaign, you get a load of criticism. he didn't raise money. he entered the race late. he didn't put togeth
examine the messages voters sent yesterday with jeffrey brown, who looks at the makeup of congress and the new laws around the country. >> woodruff: what to do about the fiscal cliff, healthcare and immigration? we explore the challenges ahead in the next four years. >> ifill: and back with us again, for analysis, are mark shields and david brooks. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: for the first time in four years, president obama did not have to worry about re-election today. still, there was little time to savor tuesday's victory, in the face of a potential fiscal crisis at the end of the year. "newshour" correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage on this day after the election of 2012. >>
in boston. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks join us with their analysis. >> ifill: jeffrey brown on who's voting and why, plus key congressional races with christina bellantoni and stuart rothenberg. >> woodruff: we get historical perspective from michael beschloss and richard norton smith. >> ifill: and hari sreenvasan shows how you can find the latest results online at our data-driven map center. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> music is a universal language. when i was in an accident i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own. with united health care i got help that fit my life, information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from, and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never miss a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. united health care. >> bnsf railway. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a heal
. now we'll go to geoffrey brown for more on these and other congressional matters. >> brown: thanks, gwen. i'm with, here with political editor christina bell and tony and stuart rothenberg, editor of the rothenberg political report. so if we start to look at the senate, they were talking about indiana called early for mitt romney on the presidential side. stu, that is not the case in this important senate race. >> we thought it might be when we first looked back months ago. >> brown: you mean months ago. richard murdoch ended up defeating richard lugar long-time senator dick lugar in a rather bitter nasty republican, an ideological race where murdoch attacked lugar for not only being too liberal on questions of guns and national security but also not having a e, not living in the state. murdoch seem to be the clear favorite to win the seat to hold on the seat for the republicans but stumble after stumble he looked sometimes unwilling to compromise, angry, bitter. and i think it worked on voters. then more recently we had a controversy on rape and abortion and whether it was a misst
to geoffrey brown for more on these and other congressional matters. >> brown: thanks, gwen. i'm with, here with political editor christina bell and tony and stuart rothenberg, editor of the rothenberg political report. so if we start to look at the senate, they were talking about early for mitt romney on the presidential side. stu, that is not the case in this important senate race. >> we thought it might be when we first looked back months ago. >> brown: you mean months ago. richard murdoch ended up defeating richard lugar long-time senatorick lugar in a rathi bitter nasty republican, an ideological racea where murdoch attacked lugar for not only being too liberal on questions of guns and national security but also not hingn ang residence in the state, not living in the state. murdoch seem to be the clear favorite to win the seat to hold on the seat for the republicans but stumble after stumble he looked sometimes unwilling to compromise, angry, bitter. and i think itorked on voters. then more recently we had a o controversy on rape a abortion and whether it was a misstatement or misinter
. latino issues. black and brown voters emerged this year as power brokers saying white people cannot get together in a historic they want. you have to deal with black and brown people as serious at the electoral level. the gop at this point is a madman group in a modern family group. i stole that of a tweet of a strategist just before we hit the air. they have to adapt to thee right now. >> i think a lot of republicans, i saw it last night and today, they try to place blame somewhere and they're going to do it inappropriately. they're going to blame sandy, chris christie paul ryan. they're going to blame voters for being dumb and voting against their interests. i think and i've said this president obama because mitt romney was the w candidate at the wrong time. i think he would have won in 2008. he needed a time machine. a bad year to be the guy running against universal health care when you crafted a similar piece of legislation in massachusetts. running on a message of business and success and capitalism when that's demonized in the class war. it was just the wrong
gets a win over scott brown in that closely watched massachusetts race. we'll look at how all the big races play out across the country, what it means for the coming fiscal fight on capitol hill. also ahead, bill karins going to join us from down democracy plaza with an update on this radar map a nor'easter headed straight for some of the same areas wiped out by last week's superstorm. we'll be right back at 30 rock in just a minute. >>> last night president obama became just the 17th president in u.s. hist troy win a second full term in office when he defeated mitt romney to reclaim the presidency. should he serve out the full second term, he'll be the 13th president in our country's hist troy do so. you want to sound smart today? tell your friends that president obama's re-election marks the first time, get this, since 1816 that the united states has had three consecutive presidents elected to a second term before president obama, of course, george w. bush and bill clinton. the last three consecutive two-term presidents were thomas jefferson, james madison, and james monroe. let's g
that showed you could vote for ident obama and linda. we are going good to tampa, where judith brown is standing by, co-director of a project, a racial justice advocate. she is joining us from tampa, and florida has just closed their polls. what did you find? >> thanks for having me. it is an interesting day. a steady flow of people throughout the day. long lines that we saw in early voting. a number of concerns. the number one concern we saw across the state is what we might call the abuse of provisional ballots. here in one county, voters coming out of the polling places saying that they did not get to vote by regular ballot. we have concern about that, because we know about 2008. they threw out about half of e ballots. real concerns. we have heard that in broward county and other areas, miami dade. we have concerns about whether or not those votes will be counted, and there was a handout across the country. ohio, the same issue. provisional ballots. using it as the default. in ohio, in particular, the state was student. -- was sued. the same thing in franklin and hamilton county's
senator scott brown. >> this victory belongs to you. you did this. you did this. you did this. for every family that has been squeezed and hammered, we're going to fight for a level playing field and put people back to work. [applause] >> and we look at ballot initiatives across the country from legalizing marijuana to upholding same-sex marriage. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. president obama has been reelected to a second term with a resounding victory over republican challenger mitt romney. obama ended the night with at least 303 electoral votes, sweeping the critical battleground states of ohio, iowa, wisconsin, pennsylvania, nevada, and colorado. obama's tally is expected to rise after in florida, were he currently leads romney by over 46,000 votes. in a victory speech from chicago, obama said he returns to the white house with renewed purpose. >> i return to the white house moh determined and more inspired than ever about the future that lies ahead. you elected us to focus on your jobs, not ours
not only won, she won by 16 points. republican senator scott brown of massachusetts, who was so stuffed with hedge fund misunderstood that he burped credit default swaps. scott brown lost by a lot to the nation's foremost authority on the economic rights of the middle class. after marriage rights for same-sex couples were voted down in state after state after state for years, more than 30 times in a row, this year, all change in maine, they voted on marriage equality and they voted for it. in maryland, they voted on marriage equality and they voted for it. in minnesota, they were asked to vote against marriage equality, and minnesota refused to ban it. in washington state, the vote is not called yet. they are still counting the vote and we will be watching it closely, but if you are on the pro-gay right side in washington state, it should be noted that it is looking pretty good. in iowa, anti-gay activists were sure that they were going to turf out a judge for ruling in favor of marriage equality. they had done it before, to a bunch of other judges. they had been successful every time t
d.c. council chair kwame brown. he'll be sentenced in two different courtrooms for two different charges. first brown will learn his fate for a federal bank charge he pled guilty to in june and admitted he lied on applications to obtain bank loans. he faces up to six months in prison. prosecutors are asking the judge to sentence him to just six days in jail because he has been cooperative. brown will also be sentenced in superior court on a misdemeanor campaign violation. he faces up to six months behind bars on that charge as well. >>> four minutes after the hour. today the trial will begin for a bowie state university student charged with murdering her roommate. alexis simpson is accused o stabbing her roommate dominique frazier in september of last year. the two got into an argument over the volume of an ipod. simpson's attorney says she was acting in self-defense and shouldn't be charged with murder. >>> in about five hours, we expect d.c. to announce that more than a dozen schools will be closing for good. schools chancellor khai ya henderson will make the announcement at 8:
hike to rescue the state's school. it was supported by governor jerry brown. it will raise $6 million annually by increasing the sales tax by a quarter cent for four years in raising income tax on the wealthy by 3 percent for seven years ticket of the brown has emerged victorious in this year's election the measure was leaving just over-- earlier results showed the measure cruising slowly but it can gain momentum after 2:00 a.m. with a difference of more than 500,000 votes. in a rally just before midnight brown declared victory sang the overstate of camelot ossicles. >> people would not otherwise agree on many things came together they can to get from many reasons. the core reason that brought people together in support of proposition 30 was the belief in our schools and our universities and in the capacity of the state government to make some wise investments that will benefit all of us. that is what proposition 30 was all about. >> proposition 30 now the first general tax the californians have passed in two decades. voting to tax themselves. here's the results of a competing measure
and i ask to you pray for the -- ask you to pray for the nation. >>> 7:03. governor jerry brown is claiming an historic victory for the first time in eight years. california voters have approved a state-wide tax hike. californians passed proposition 30. ktvu's tara moriarty is in san francisco one of the biggest backers of the measure. >> reporter: it's no secret that public schools in san francisco are struggling. so for that reason, many parents decided to put their kids in private schools. also, voters in alameda and santa cruz county had support as well. but mo-dot county did not support this proposition. this is mission high school. in san francisco, it's it's the oldest -- it's the oldest high school. governor jerry brown spoke to supporters at the sheridan hotel before 11:30. he said nowhere else in the country would people vote for an education tax. >> here we are, we have a vote of the people. >> now, prop 30 will raise taxes for people who make at least $250,000 by up po 3 percentage points for three years. it's expected to raise $6 billion a year for three years for t
attention is for the two at- large seats in the council. incumbents michael brown and vincent orange are facing challenges, five, in fact, and other candidates for the two spots. >> nationally, all eyes are on the presidential race. tom, let's talk about the state's that are going to be key in this battle as we get right down here to the final votes. >> we don't have to go far. virginia. >> virginia. yes. >> you look at what has gone on the last few years, when you say battleground states what you need to have. in 2,000 it was florida, four years ago, ohio and this year, ohio is going to be key. let's keep it in virginia for a minute. you talked a minute go ago about the senate race going on between tim kaine and between george allen. tim kaine in his gubernatorial race, allen and also mark warner. virginia has gone increasingly purple. you have a situation where northern virginia, especially n areas of louden county and fairfax county, they have gotten progressively more democratic over the last few years. now, it's a different picture altogether when you go down to the county, part
in massachusetts and warren defeated brown. for that one independent expected to lead democratic during voting time and there are 46 republicans. the democrats reclaim control. and the republicans were take the majority in the house. cnn is projecting the gop to have 234 seats compared to 193 for the democrats. republicans failed with the presidency, failed to take the seventh of the gop it maintains a substantial majority in the house. right here. as that does is saddling we are asking you on facebook now that the election is over what you think are the chances of democrats and republicans working together? feel free to let us know what you think on our facebook fan page. >>pam: their reelected senior feinstein is saying that the biggest challenges is divided congress. once again it is into the control of the democrats and the republicans control the house but they need to work together. >> we must do the people's business we have to find ways to use that word which some are disdainful of. and i see an enormously positive sense and that is the word compromise. that is how you get things done in th
, picking up seats in indiana and massachusetts, a big win there for elizabeth warren against scott brown. we're still waiting on results from montana and north dakota but departments have the lead right now. the two independents, king from maine and sanders from vermont are expecting to caucus with the democrats, right now 53 democratic seats to republican 45 and that could go up to 55 if the determines win montana and north dakota. we'll be right back. i.q. will go way up. how are you ever going to solve the problem if you don't look at all of the pieces? >>tv and radio talk show host stephanie miller rounds out current's morning news block. >>you're welcome current tv audience for the visual candy. >>sharp tongue, quick whit and above all, politically direct. >>you just think there is no low they won't go to. oh, no. if al gore's watching today... >> announcer: broadcasting across the nation, this is the "bill press show." >> bill: how sweet it is and you bet! good morning everybody! congratulations to president obama and to all of us. it's a great victory. savor it enjoy it. put a big
to lose maine, they may lose massachusetts, where scott brown a rerunning and may lose indiana where dick luger was primaried this year and richard murdoch running against donnelly. a good pickup opportunities, nebraska and north dakota, but most of the reigning ones of these races are very, very close, so if you need five or six, what we seem to be looking at here is a replay of 2010 where the numbers are possible, but the republicans to take control are pretty much going to have to run the table and may depend how mitt romney does that night. >> paul: steve, is this a candidate problem in part? scott brown has done, i mean, is a tremendous political talent, very, very good politician for that state, but it looks like he may lose to elizabeth warren just because that state is so liberal? >> yeah, well, let me answer your question, i think it's pretty lousy candidates on the republican side of the aisle and democrats are recruiting pretty good candidates this year, examination, bob carey in nebraska is making that price potentially tight. a red state. your home state of wisconsin tammy ba
? >> i like it. >> bill: hope you guys appreciate this. tom harkin from iowa. sherrod brown to be re-elected today as the senator from ohio. it is tuesday. tuesdays with judd. judd legum will be here from think progress. that's just a few of our guests. many guests this morning. look, i'm going to give you the exact count of what's going to happen today. don't have to wait up tonight. i'll tell you. but first -- >> this is the "full court press." >> other headlines making news on this tuesday the minnesota vikings player who has been an outspoken proponent of marriage equality is sticking up for his beliefs. chris cluey resigned after that newspaper endorsed minnesota amendment one which would embed inequality into the state's constitution. he had contributed a blog to the paper's web site on all things sports and politics. >> bill: if minnesota joined some of these other half-ass, half-brained states in making -- in opposing marriage equality, i would really be disappointed because that's a state with a gre
was in the capital, with the protesters. sherrod brown, in ohio, turned his campaign over to the movement in that state to overturn their anti-labor law. and so, you really saw something begin a very long time ago. and there were a lot of people who were hard-pressed, who got engaged politically, in defense of their own labor rights a year and a half ago, and transitioned that into this campaign. now, the interesting thing that happened, in this campaign, is that mitt romney showed himself to be precisely the sort of person that they had been fighting. someone who was clearly committed to attacking unions, but also who was willing to say and do anything to win. and i cannot emphasize to you, not just in ohio, but in other states across the great industrial heartland, romney's comments saying that jeep was going to close and move to china, that scared is people? >> you heard that a lot in toledo last night? >> and it also woke a lot of people up. not just in toledo. in toledo, yes, ed, but also up in detroit. i heard it over in wisconsin. i think it's very important to realize, a lot of th
for a number of years mostly brown university, so i really didn't teach the 60's because it wasn't history but later on that became an important part of my courses and then i've written some books which talked about aspects of the 60's and like a lot of other historians i became uncomfortable in the notion that the sixties could be described as something 1960 to 1976 so they like to talk to the 30's or the 20s or the 90's and so forth you can do that because of the power throughout the decade. mostly it doesn't work and here is the 60's i don't think it does either. because if you look back at what was happening in the early 60's, 60, 61, 63, 64, at least until kennedy assassination in november, 1963 and so much of daily life and popular culture and music and politics and so forth and the way people dress and so forth seem very much like the 50's and when we think of the fifties we think of a lot of turmoil, political polarization, urban riots, vietnam, rock concert and woodstock and so on and i became convinced that you really shouldn't talk about the 60's, 1960 to 1970 but something wher
for a number of years, mostly at brown university. as we move through this thing, i started doing this in the 60s, so i didn't teach the 60s because it was in history. later on an important part of my courses and i've written some books which talked about aspects of the 60s. like a lot of other historians, i became a little bit uncomfortable with the notion that the 60s can be described as something 1960 to 1970. historians like to do this. they like to talk about the 30s or or the 20s or the 90s and so forth. sometimes it works. in the 30s you can do that because of depression throughout the decade. mostly it doesn't work because if you look back with in the early 60s, 61, 62, 63, 64 until kennedy's assassination in november 1963, so much a daily life in popular culture and music and politics and the way people dress and so forth seemed very much like the 60s. when we think of the 60s we think of a lot of turmoil, polarization, urban riots rock concerts, woodstock, so forth and so on. and i became convinced that he should not talk about the 60s as 19621970, the something with the
at this race, it would have -- would have been a huge gamble. scott brown distanced himself from todd akin. ultimately, too much damage has been done. the castle will not when buying the best when they by double digits, but she -- the pasco will not win by double digits, but she will win -- mccasdkill will not wednesday by double digits, but she will win. heller deserves credit for running what has been a good campaign. turnout is the bane question and how much present show -- turnout is the big question. we moved this race into our tilt republican category. it has been a while since we have seen surveys outside of the margin. >> and finally, arizona. >> democrats have made republicans work for it. a former surgeon general. an oppressive police and military background. flake suffered from a bruising primary. he had to spend a lot of this money. we are seeing the state go back to a republican lean. rounding will win comfortably. we sought -- we saw mitt romney cut an ad for jeff flake. turnout could be key. there is a large lbs population there. -- lds population there. they are breeding --
brown's tax initiative to raise money for education. he went for a final push to get proposition 30 passed. amberly is in sack where -- sacramento where the governor is scheduled to watch the returns. >> we are inside of the main ballroom in downtown sheraton in downtown sacramento. this is where the governor jerry brown and prop 30 are holding a watch party after the polls close at 8:00. workers have set up the decorations, signs and a podium. the governor spent the morning in oakland. he voted at a fire stationary his home. he held a press conference to try to get last minute report for prop 30. if passed. the statewide initiative will raise income and sales tacks to help prevent cuts to schools. if it fails, they say schools will face a 6 billion-dollar in cuts. opponents call it a shell game and say there's no guarantee that money will be use the for schools. back here live, we checked in with democratic party officials to see when the governor is scheduled to arrive at the party. they will only say sometime after 8:00. that is the latest from here. amberly. ktvu. >>> the socia
schools banking on prop 30, governor jerry brown proposed that plan, today voted for it. people in oakland greeted him in the oakland hills, proposition 30 raises money for public schools and community colleges and temporarily add a quarter cent tax to state sales tax and raise taxes for californians earning more than $250,000 a year. opponents say it's too expensive. here is a look at propositions. prop 32 preventing unions from deducting money from paychecks to be used to be political funding. prop 36 would revise california's three strikes law. and propos3s]u 37 would add new food labeling requirements. proposition 38 is a competing tax measure to fund schools. the department of justice will have federal observers in polling stations in alameda county today. 800 monitors will be watching for potential voting rights violations in 23 states. if you have trouble voting you can report any problems at your polling station to abc 7 news election hot line. the number is on the screen. and we have that number posted for you on abc 7 news.com. you still have three and a half hours to vote in the
state senator nina turner, also with us tonight is judith brown dianis, the co-director of the advancement project. judith, let me ask you first, what is the biggest threat at the polls as you see it right now? >> sure. well, thanks for having me, ed. we have moved from politicians who have tried to manipulate the laws to restrict the vote to now these partisan operatives. you know, in ohio you have husted, the secretary of state, who has been on a relentless effort to restrict the vote, who now admits there has been a glitch in the computer system. 33,000 people who registered have not found themselves on the rolls and cannot get their absentee ballots. it is a glitch. then you have true the vote, organizations that say that they're about election integrity who are preparing to challenge the eligibility of voters at the polls because they say it is about election integrity. and, in fact, if it is about election integrity, they should go to ohio and protest outside of husted's house. that's not what it is about. they're trying to make sure the people who turned
profitable last month?hat looks great. how much money is in your checking account? have the browns paid you for their addition yet? your finances are scattered all over the place. mm-hmm. what are your monthly expenses? you keep your receipts in plastic baggies? seriously? [ announcer ] get it done and get it off your mind... with quickbooks. organize your small business finances... all in one place. quickbooks pulls in information from other sources. even online banking and customer information. visit tryquickbooksfree.com today for your free 30-day trial. and now your business can be at your fingertips, anywhere, with the convenient mobile app. from creating customized invoices, to tracking sales and expenses, quickbooks can help you manage... every detail of your business. and at tax time, all your records... will be automatically organized and ready to go, saving you time on prep work. quickbooks, guaranteed easy or your money back. learn more and get your free 30-day trial today... at tryquickbooksfree.com. >>> whoever gets elected president will have to deal with a lot more partisan c
election day forecast next. also, senator scott brown looking to fend off a challenge from elizabeth warren in the state of massachusetts. just one of the many close races playing out for control of the u.s. senate. "way too early" coming back to democracy plaza on msnbc. >> i was in the lincoln room a moment ago and saw a full sculpture of abraham lincoln and i get a catch in my throat as i see him. >> what lincoln said was that through our government, we should do together what we cannot do as well for ourselves. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash before your eyes. ♪ make it worth watching. ♪ the new 2013 lexus ls. an entirely new pursuit. yeah. then how'd i get this... [ voice of dennis ] ...safe driving bonus check? every six months without an accident, allstate sends a check. ok. [ voice of dennis ] silence. are you in good hands? progresso. in what world do potatoes, bacon and cheese add up to 100 calories? your world. ♪ [ whispers ] real bacon... creamy cheese... 100 calories... [ chef ] ma'am [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. a
already. >> that's just to get everything warmed through. put it on to the broiler. put it brown and chris pee. put it on here for a second. >> this has been a french stable for years. >> yes. >> we're just doing our own. not trying to re invent the wheel or anything. >> redesigning it on one side. >> so brill it on both sides. so tell me about this 64 degree egg thing. >> sure. what you do is cook the egg at a specific temperature. and what that does is it gives you the ability to have a very custahdy texture. >> it takes time and patience. >> it does. >> yes. the cooking process itself is 48 minutes but you have to heat up the water and cook the eggs and cool the eggs down and heat them back up. it's a whole process for sure. used to like to cook eggs but this is high maintenance. >> this is our 64 degree egg. >> this is 64 degree celsius. >> that's how the egg naturally is. it's a slow process. doesn't have that harsh quick cook time. has a nice silkiness. >> why does it work on every item you serve on your menu? >> everybody likes that richness. everybody loves an ego the burger. it ha
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 190 (some duplicates have been removed)